Dyson humidifier disinfects the air using UV light

Dyson has launched its first humidifier, tackling hygiene issues which are usually related to typical humidifiers by boasting its ability to disinfect and kill water-based bacteria with UV light.

Dyson Humidifier

Dyson Humidifier

The new product was unveiled in Japan, and aims to combat a wide range of health problems ranging from eczema to psoriasis, thyroid disorders, chapped lips, blocked sinuses and acne, by killing 99.9% of bacteria in water before it enters the room. Breathing dry household air can aggravate breathing problems for allergy sufferers and also increase the body’s susceptibility to viruses. Humidifiers are traditionally used to prevent these symptoms by removing the dry air in which the viruses and bacteria thrive.

Dyson Humidifier

Dyson Humidifier

The British technology company’s humidifier packs in three separate technologies with sets it apart from other humidifiers currently in the market which harbours bacteria and circulate it around the home when it’s in use. It utilises ultrasonic to humidify the air, ultraviolet to kill bacteria and Dyson’s Air Multiplier technology to ensure that the humidified air is evenly distributed throughout the room. Sensors are also integrated to monitor humidity level and keep it between 30 and 70% whilst the machine uses a piezoelectric transducer which vibrates to 1.7 million times a second to produce tiny airborne microscopic water particles.

Dyson Humidifier

Dyson Humidifier

There is a three-litre tank with the humidifier, which the company is promising 18 hours of run time. It is very quiet, and also comes with an intelligent climate control which will allow users to measure both the temperature and moisture in the air.

Dyson claims that it has invested over $60.4 million into the humidifier’s development, producing 643 prototypes along the way. The machine will also work as a regular fan in the summer, and launched in Japan today and will be hitting shelves in the UK in March 2015, exclusively through John Lewis and on Dyson.co.uk. The technology will come cheap though, with a price tag expected to be between £400 and £500.

Via The Telegraph.

Kai-Li Yang

Kai-Li is a tech enthusiast with an in-depth knowledge of mobile technology, music technology and the entertainment industry. She hails from Taiwan and helps Tech Assimilate to erm... assimilate, all the latest tech news and trends from East Asia. Kai-Li Yang on Google+

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