Fancy an NES with 1080p graphics and anodised aluminium chassis?

If you are a video game enthusiast who would like to enjoy the old NES glory days on your new flat screen LCD TV then Analogue Interactive are hoping that you are someone who has $500 of disposable income to splash on such frippery.

Analogue Nt console

Analogue Nt console

Old video game enthusiasts may be tempted to fritter away their grey pound or gray dollars on the Analogue Nt console which contains an original NES motherboard and is also built into a chassis which is crafted from a single block of ‘6061 aluminium’. This metal was used in the original NES construction but we must admit this design, which shares more curves with the N64, is a good looking box for any geeky living room.

No emulation

Due to its original innards this console is compatible with all NES and Famicom accessories and games and Analogue Interactive are happy to sell original NES and Famicom controllers and cables to connect to your TV on via their site too. However looking though the console and accessories list really makes you consider the price of these things…

Analogue Nt console

Analogue Nt console

The Analogue Nt console costs a pretty hefty $499 on pre-order right now in a ‘classic’ bare anodised aluminium finish. Other colours such as black, pink, blue and red require a further $49 sum. The if you want to use one of the headline features of this console – 1080p output to an HDMI TV then you will need to stump up for a $49 HDMI adapter. A new OEM NES controller will cost $49 while a refurb one (or refurb Famicom design one) will cost you $29. Other cables and connectors such as SCART, Component and S-Video cost $29. A power adaptor for your region is supplied for free.

Analogue Nt with controller

Analogue Nt with controller

Are you interested in this retro games hardware or content to play with the emulators from your smartphone, tablet, console or computer? The Analogue RT ships in summer this year.

Mark Tyson

Mark has worked for a number of years as a newshound on other technology news websites. He decided to write for Tech Assimilate thanks to this web site's open embracing vision of the fascinating world of personal technology. Mark has also worked in the printing and advertising industries for tens of years previously.

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